Welcome to the Department of Neurology at VCU School of Medicine’s residency program!

We are delighted that you’re pursuing a career in neurology, a fascinating and dynamic field currently undergoing an incredible period of growth and discovery.

Our residency program provides world-class clinical training in a supportive and collegial environment while ensuring our graduates obtain the skills they need to become leaders and pioneers in the field of neurology. 

You can expect a comprehensive education in the diagnosis and management of common and rare neurological diseases in a diverse patient population. Skilled clinicians, researchers and educators who are deeply invested in your educational development and success will provide guidance and mentorship throughout your time at VCU. 

Our program is designed with flexibility, and we encourage you to pursue educational opportunities and personal growth outside of your core clinical training. This gives you the chance to explore interests you may have in areas such as subspecialty care, research, education and international medicine.  

Just as this is an exciting time to be a neurologist, it’s an especially exciting time to be at VCU. Our department is experiencing a period of growth and development, allowing even more opportunities for our residents as they pursue careers in neurology. We're actively expanding our already robust complement of subspecialists and the residency program has grown to include eight residents. We're excited for you to contribute your own passions, interests and talents to the growing department and leave your mark on the residency program.

Warmly, 

Education Leadership

Message from the Director

VCUSOM Message from the Director - Message from the Director

Message from the Director

"At VCU, we aim to train the next generation of neurologists who care deeply about their communities through authentic, diverse experiences, innovative learner-centric curricula, and close mentorship.

— Pearce Korb, MD







Each of the 13 blocks consists of 2 separate 2-week rotations

PGY1: All residents who match into our program also receive a preliminary intern year in internal medicine at VCU. We have worked closely with our IM colleagues to craft an intern year that gives a strong foundation in medicine with rotations of particular relevance to future neurologists (including palliative care, hematology/oncology, and Neuroscience ICU experiences), as well as begins to prepare our preliminary residents for their neurology years. Preliminary residents rotate through the Neuroscience ICU and Stroke consult team, and also have a 2 week “neurology boot camp” block at the end of their intern year. Please see click here for more details on the preliminary year and a sample schedule.

PGY2: The goal of our PGY-2 year is to acclimate our residents to the care of acute neurologic conditions in the inpatient setting, while also giving them ample outpatient and elective experiences early in their training. This combination allows our residents to start their training with a well-rounded knowledge of neurology, while helping allowing them to begin exploring their specific interests. Roughly half their year is spent on inpatient services (Wards, Consults, Day float, Night float, and at the  Veterans Affairs Medical Center consult team.  The other half is spent on electives and outpatient rotations (including EMG, EEG, movement disorders, and neuro-ophthalmology). 

PGY-3 and PGY-4:  Our residents continue to develop graduated leadership responsibilities during these years, with PGY-3 residents taking on senior roles by the second half of the year.  Residents continue to have ample elective and outpatient time in addition to their roles as inpatient team leaders, and also incorporate time in child neurology, psychiatry, and Neuroscience ICU.

 Please click here for the Residency Yearly Schedule sample. 

Residents rotate through the following:

Neurology Inpatient Services

Two inpatient neurology teams, one a General Neurology Service (seizures/status epilepticus, Multiple Sclerosis, AIDP, CNS cancers, Myasthenia Gravis, autoimmune encephalitis, etc) and one a Stroke Service. Each team consists of a neurology faculty member, senior resident, junior resident, psych intern, and a nurse practitioner. Residents lead the care of the patient, overseen by the attending faculty member.   Members of the neurology inpatient teams work with the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit (NSICU) team to co-manage critically ill neurological patients, and residents on the inpatient teams are also part of the pool of doctors responding to and managing acute stroke alerts, as well.

Neurology Consultation Services

The consult team, consisting of a neurology faculty member, senior resident, junior resident, nurse practitioner, and sometimes other rotating residents (medicine, neurosurgery, PM&R, etc). The team handles consults from other inpatient services and the Department of Emergency Medicine, with residents on the consult service also being in the pool to respond to acute stroke alerts. This is one of the most active consultation services at the hospital, with a wide breadth and depth of neurological conditions.

Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit (NSICU)

Residents rotate through the NSICU during PGY-1, PGY-3, and PGY-4 under the supervision of NSICU intensivist faculty. On this rotation, residents learn to diagnose and manage critically ill patients with acute neurological conditions, including strokes, status epilepticus, myasthenic crisis, and encephalitis; patients are co-managed with the neurology inpatient team. Residents have hands-on opportunities to perform and become certified in a number of procedures, such as line placements.

Epilepsy and Electroencephalogram (EEG)

Residents learn to perform and interpret routine and long-term EEG monitoring, for both adult and pediatric patients. In addition to reading EEGs, residents will also see epilepsy patients in clinic and receive instruction on the medical and surgical management of epilepsy syndromes. Neurology residents complete a minimum of two months of EEG training during their time in the program.

Neuromuscular and Electromyography (EMG)

During a minimum of two months of EMG training, residents receive hands-on education in the diagnosis of neuromuscular conditions and their management. Residents gradually obtain more responsibility in performing nerve conduction studies and EMG, and after four weeks of training, they will be able to independently perform their own EMG procedures while under supervision.   

In addition to performing EMGs, residents will also see patients in neuromuscular clinics, including the multidisciplinary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinic. 

Central Virginia VA Healthcare System

The neurology services available at the Richmond-area Veterans Affairs hospital are integral to the Department of Neurology and its residency program. The rotations involve managing the inpatient service, consultations and EEG interpretation, plus they engage in neurology outpatient general and subspecialty clinics.

Day Float

The Day float resident is a PGY-2 who works with the consult team from 12PM-8PM Monday through Thursday, and 7AM-5PM on Saturday and Sunday; the Day Float has Friday off. This resident sees new consults in conjunction with the consult team, is in the pool for responding to acute stroke alerts, and also assists the inpatient team with procedures (LPs, etc) and education of residents and medical students.

Night Float

The night float rotation is two weeks long, consisting of in-house overnight call from Sunday to Friday nights from 8PM-9AM, with Saturday night off. One junior and one senior neurology resident are on night float together and they see emergency consults (including acute stroke alerts), as well as cover the inpatient neurology services.

All consults are staffed via phone overnight with a neurology faculty member. Night float residents present any admissions to the day team in the morning and go home by 9 a.m.

Outpatient Neurology

Our program is unique in that as part of our core curriculum, we provide residents with ample time in several dedicated outpatient subspecialty rotations, starting early in their training and continuing throughout their residency.  

Part of this outpatient experience consists of an Ambulatory Care Center rotation, where residents can explore a variety of outpatient neurology subspecialty clinics of their choosing over the course of the two-week block.   

Throughout their three years of training, residents also maintain a half-day per week of their own continuity clinic.

Pediatric Neurology

Residents manage inpatient and emergency room consults and advise the inpatient pediatric team. During this rotation, residents gain broad experience in the management and treatment of pediatric neurological disorders including epilepsy, developmental abnormalities and metabolic disorders. They are directly overseen by faculty specializing in pediatric neurology.

Psychiatry

PGY-4 residents will spend 4 weeks as members of the psychiatry consult-liaison services at VCU Medical Center. This rotation exposes residents to the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic psychiatric conditions including delirium, depression, anxiety, psychosis, personality disorders and suicidality, plus the intersection of psychiatric conditions and a variety of medical conditions. 

Scholarly Activity

All residents will participate in scholarly activity during their residency. All PGY-3’s present a case at the yearly Night of the Cases dinner (with the highest rated resident receiving a free trip to present their case at the annual Virginia Neurological Society meeting at the Omni Homestead resort). All PGY-4’s present at the departmental Grand Rounds. In addition, residents are encouraged to participate in a research project during their residency, under the guidance of a faculty research mentor of their choosing. Previous research projects have included basic and translational research, clinical research, outcomes and health utilization, education, health care disparities and clinical case presentations with literature review. Residents will also receive training from their research mentors in topics of study design, funding and implementation.

Electives

In addition to the required outpatient rotations detailed above, additional elective time is provided during the 3 years of residency. Potential electives include (but are not limited to): 

  • Neuro-radiology
  • Neuro-Ophthalmology
  • Neuro-pathology
  • Neurosurgery 
  • Headache/chemo-denervation
  • Movement disorders 
  • Epilepsy
  • Neuro-cognitive/Dementia
  • Sleep 
  • Neuromuscular
  • Neuro-Oncology
  • Global Health Neurology
  • Tele-neurology
  • TBI
  • Pain Medicine
  • Speech and Language Pathology 

Residents may also use elective time to become more adept at electrodiagnostic tests like EMG, EEG, or to further pursue scholarly projects.  

Throughout the three-year program, residents take part in a multitude of didactic lectures and conferences facilitated by a combination of residents and faculty with expertise in the topics at hand.

Current and upcoming didactic opportunities include:   

  • Journal club 
  • Morning report 
  • Comprehensive subspecialty series exploring the neuroanatomy, neuropathology, clinical presentations and management of a variety of neurological conditions 
  • Grand rounds 
  • Subspecialty conferences in neurovascular, neuromuscular, epilepsy, movement disorders, and quality improvement.  
  • Updates in the field of neurology
  • The business of neurology  
  • The ethics of neurology 
  • Joint Neurology/Neurosurgery Case Conference 
  • Neuroimaging Conference
  • Localization Rounds

 

Coronda Lee, Medical Education Team Lead

VCUSOM Message from the Dean - Contact

Coronda Lee, Medical Education Team Lead

Coronda received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology in 2014 from St. Leo University and her Masters in Program Management in 2018 from Colorado State University. Previously, Coronda served as a Program Coordinator at the University of Iowa in the Department of Neurology.

If you have any questions about the Neurology Residency Program, please see Coronda's contact information below:

Coronda Lee, Medical Education Team Lead

Email: Coronda.Lee@vcuhealth.org







 

3 resident doctors standing in hallway 

Welcome to VCU Neurology! As Chief Residents, we are proud of the education and training we have received, and we want to highlight some of the reasons we are grateful for our experience here. The greatest strength of VCU Neurology is the relationship you build with the people you work with. There is a very strong sense of camaraderie among the residents. We enjoy being together, whether it’s working in the team room or spending time together outside the hospital. There is an emphasis on residents getting the chance to teach and learn from each other, with senior residents taking an active role in training juniors. Additionally, our faculty members take a great interest in teaching residents, both formally and informally, and promoting resident growth by encouraging residents to take control of rounds and patient encounters. They provide support while also allowing us enough autonomy to become strong and confident physicians. We are fortunate to have a department that is always expanding, and faculty members from nearly every subspecialty of neurology. This provides the opportunity to get early exposure to both inpatient and outpatient settings, and a wide breadth of pathology. We also get to choose a mentor early in residency, take part in research projects, pick up case reports, and discuss interesting topics in our many conferences. Whether you want to do general inpatient neurology or a very specific outpatient subspecialty, you can find your niche here at VCU Neurology. If you have any questions regarding our program, VCU, or Richmond in general, please feel free to contact us! 

Sincerely,
Teryn Nogles, MD
S. Zach Cox, DO
Usaamah Khan, MD

 

VCU Health System, Department of Neurology Housestaff are listed below

   

PGY-2

Mckenzye Dehart-McCoyle, DO

Mckenzye Dehart-McCoyle, DO

PGY-2

Mckenzye Dehart-McCoyle, DO

Mckenzye Dehart-McCoyle, DO

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine

Ryan Lamb

Ryan Lamb

PGY-2

Ryan Lamb

Ryan Lamb

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Haripreet Mayo, MD

Haripreet Mayo, MD

PGY-2 (starting November 2021)

Haripreet Mayo, MD

Haripreet Mayo, MD

PGY-2 (starting November 2021)

Department of Neurology

Ryan Naum, DO

Ryan Naum, DO

PGY-2

Ryan Naum, DO

Ryan Naum, DO

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

Tri Nguyen, MD

Tri Nguyen, MD

PGY-2

Tri Nguyen, MD

Tri Nguyen, MD

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School: Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific

Shital Patel, MD

Shital Patel, MD

PGY-2

Shital Patel, MD

Shital Patel, MD

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine

Victoria Phoumthipphavong, MD

Victoria Phoumthipphavong, MD

PGY-2

Victoria Phoumthipphavong, MD

Victoria Phoumthipphavong, MD

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: USF Health Morsani College of Medicine

Mehreen Shahid, MD

Mehreen Shahid, MD

PGY-2, Child Neurology

Mehreen Shahid, MD

Mehreen Shahid, MD

PGY-2, Child Neurology

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine

Michael Todd, MD

Michael Todd, MD

PGY-2

Michael Todd, MD

Michael Todd, MD

PGY-2

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine

PGY-3

Christopher Bird, MD

Christopher Bird, MD

PGY-3

Christopher Bird, MD

Christopher Bird, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

Jane Chang, MD

Jane Chang, MD

PGY-3

Jane Chang, MD

Jane Chang, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Medical School of Georgia

Darina Dinov, DO

Darina Dinov, DO

PGY-3, Child Neurology

Darina Dinov, DO

Darina Dinov, DO

PGY-3, Child Neurology

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Western University of Health Sciences Osteopathic School

Junghoon “John” Ha, MD

Junghoon “John” Ha, MD

PGY-3

Junghoon “John” Ha, MD

Junghoon “John” Ha, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

Phillip Lee, MD

Phillip Lee, MD

PGY-3

Phillip Lee, MD

Phillip Lee, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Medical University of South Caroline

Mark Magharious, MD

Mark Magharious, MD

PGY-3

Mark Magharious, MD

Mark Magharious, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: St. George's University School of Medicine

Lauren Menzies, MD

Lauren Menzies, MD

PGY-3

Lauren Menzies, MD

Lauren Menzies, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

Deep Patel, MD

Deep Patel, MD

PGY-3

Deep Patel, MD

Deep Patel, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Morehouse School of Medicine

Vivek Patel, MD

Vivek Patel, MD

PGY-3

Vivek Patel, MD

Vivek Patel, MD

PGY-3

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: University of South Alabama College of Medicine

PGY-4

Christopher Henry, MD

Christopher Henry, MD

PGY-4, Child Neurology

Christopher Henry, MD

Christopher Henry, MD

PGY-4, Child Neurology

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Virginia Common Wealth University School of Medicine

Benjamin Alwood, MD

Benjamin Alwood, MD

PGY-4

Benjamin Alwood, MD

Benjamin Alwood, MD

PGY-4

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Ross University School of Medicine

Matthew Anderson, DO

Matthew Anderson, DO

PGY-4

Matthew Anderson, DO

Matthew Anderson, DO

PGY-4

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Arizona College of Oestopathic Medicine of Midwestern

Stephen “Zach” Cox, DO

Stephen “Zach” Cox, DO

PGY-4, Chief

Stephen “Zach” Cox, DO

Stephen “Zach” Cox, DO

PGY-4, Chief

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

Erik Haley, MD

Erik Haley, MD

PGY-4

Erik Haley, MD

Erik Haley, MD

PGY-4

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Eastern Virginia Medical School of the Medical College of Hampton Roads

Usaamah Khan, MD

Usaamah Khan, MD

PGY-4, Chief

Usaamah Khan, MD

Usaamah Khan, MD

PGY-4, Chief

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Ross University School of Medicine

Teryn Nogles, MD

Teryn Nogles, MD

PGY-4, Chief

Teryn Nogles, MD

Teryn Nogles, MD

PGY-4, Chief

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: New York Medical College

Anton Ostashko, MD

Anton Ostashko, MD

PGY-4

Anton Ostashko, MD

Anton Ostashko, MD

PGY-4

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: St. George's University School of Medicine

Hiral Padia, DO

Hiral Padia, DO

PGY-4

Hiral Padia, DO

Hiral Padia, DO

PGY-4

Department of Neurology

Medical School Attended: Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie

Zachary Ward, MD

Zachary Ward, MD

Neuromuscular Medicine Fellow

Zachary Ward, MD

Zachary Ward, MD

Neuromuscular Medicine Fellow

Department of Neurology

Neurology Residency Completed at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Adil Niaz, DO

Adil Niaz, DO

Clinical Neurophysiology Fellow

Adil Niaz, DO

Adil Niaz, DO

Clinical Neurophysiology Fellow

Department of Neurology

Completed Residency at Virginia Commonwealth University

Leila Ghaffari, DO

Leila Ghaffari, DO

Clinical Neurophysiology Fellow

Leila Ghaffari, DO

Leila Ghaffari, DO

Clinical Neurophysiology Fellow

Department of Neurology

Neurology Residency Completed at Tufts Medical Center